Stem Cell Therapy | why no more news about embryonic stem cells – Video



Stem Cell Therapy | why no more news about embryonic stem cells
http://www.arthritistreatmentcenter.com Is embryonic stem cell research passe? Next How come no more news about embryonic stem cells? Embryonic stem cells come from human embryos and these…

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Stem Cell Therapy | why no more news about embryonic stem cells – Video

Stem cells act as 'first aid kits' in repairing damaged immune response

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Stem cells act as 'first aid kits' in repairing damaged immune response

Will Stem Cell Treatment work for you? – Video



Will Stem Cell Treatment work for you?
Dr Ralph Bright of Macquarie Stem Cells reveals whether or not stem cell treatment will work for you, depending on what you wish to treat. http://www.macquar…

By: Macquarie Stem Cells

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Will Stem Cell Treatment work for you? – Video

Supporting your Stem Cell Treatment with Supplements – Video



Supporting your Stem Cell Treatment with Supplements
Dr Ralph Bright discusses the best types of supplements that can help to improve the effect of your Stem Cell Treatment. http://www.macquariestemcells.com/ h…

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Supporting your Stem Cell Treatment with Supplements – Video

Migraine Stem Cell Treatment – Video



Migraine Stem Cell Treatment
Dr Ralph Bright of Macquarie Stem Cells discusses the results he has seen when treating severe migraine sufferers with stem cell therapy. http://www.macquari…

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Rotator Cuff Injury Stem Cell Treatment Testimonial – Video



Rotator Cuff Injury Stem Cell Treatment Testimonial
Dr. Dennis Lox treats patient that has shoulder pain using Stem Cell Therapy with excellent results. Dr. Lox | http://www.drloxstemcells.com | (844) 440-8503.

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Rotator Cuff Injury Stem Cell Treatment Testimonial – Video

Stem cell revolution gets closer

Edgar Irastorza was just 31 when his heart stopped beating in October 2008.

A Miami property manager, Irastorza had recently gained weight as his wife’s third pregnancy progressed. “I kind of got pregnant, too,” he said.

During a workout one day, he felt short of breath and insisted that friends rush him to the hospital. Minutes later, his pulse flatlined. He survived the heart attack, but the scar tissue that resulted cut his heart’s pumping ability by a third. He couldn’t pick up his children. He fell asleep every night wondering if he would wake up in the morning.

Desperation motivated Irastorza to volunteer for a highly unusual medical research trial: getting stem cells injected directly into his heart. “I just trusted my doctors and the science behind it, and said, ‘This is my only chance,’ ” he said recently.

Over the last five years, by studying stem cells in lab dishes, test animals and intrepid patients like Irastorza, researchers have brought the vague, grandiose promises of stem cell therapies closer to reality.

Stem cells broke into the public consciousness in the early 1990s, alluring for their potential to help the body beat back diseases of degeneration like Alzheimer’s, and to grow new parts to treat conditions like spinal cord injuries.

Progress has been slow. But researchers are learning how to best use stem cells, what types to use and how to deliver them to the body findings that are not singularly transformational, but progressive and pragmatic.

As many as 4,500 clinical trials involving stem cells are under way in the United States to treat patients with heart disease, blindness, Parkinson’s, HIV, blood cancers and spinal cord injuries, among other conditions.

Initial studies suggest that stem cell therapy can be delivered safely, said Dr. Ellen Feigal, senior vice president of research and development at the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, the state stem cell agency, which has awarded more than $2 billion toward stem cell research since 2006.

But enthusiasm for stem cells sometimes outstrips the science. When Gov. Rick Perry of Texas had adult stem cells injected into his spine in 2011 for a back injury, his surgeon had never tried the procedure and had no data to support the experiment. A June review in the New England Journal of Medicine found that “platelet-rich plasma” stem cell therapies praised by a number of athletes worked no better than placebos.

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Stem cell revolution gets closer

Molecule that boosts cord blood stem cells could up transplants to treat leukemia

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Molecule that boosts cord blood stem cells could up transplants to treat leukemia

New molecule allows for up to 10-fold increase in stem cell transplants

Investigators from the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at the Universit de Montral have just published, in the journal Science, the announcement of the discovery of a new molecule, the first of its kind, which allows for the multiplication of stem cells in a unit of cord blood. Umbilical cord stem cells are used for transplants aimed at curing a number of blood-related diseases, including leukemia, myeloma and lymphoma. For many patients this therapy comprises a treatment of last resort.

Directed by Dr. Guy Sauvageau, principal investigator at IRIC and hematologist at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, the research has the potential to multiply by 10 the number of cord blood units available for a transplant in humans. In addition, it will considerably reduce the complications associated with stem cell transplantation. And it will be particularly useful for non-Caucasian patients for whom compatible donors are difficult to identify.

A clinical study using this molecule, named UM171 in honor of the Universit de Montral, and a new type of bioreactor developed for stem culture in collaboration with the University of Toronto will be initiated in December 2014 at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital.

According to Dr. Guy Sauvageau, “This new molecule, combined with the new bioreactor technology, will allow thousands of patients around the world access to a safer stem cell transplant. Considering that many patients currently cannot benefit from a stem cell transplant for lack of matching donors, this discovery looks to be highly promising for the treatment of various types of cancer.”

The Centre of Excellence for Cellular Therapy at the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital will serve as production unit for these stem cells, and grafts will then be distributed to patients in Montreal, Quebec City and Vancouver for this first Canadian clinical study. Tangible results should be available one year later, that is, in December 2015. The significance of this new discovery is such that over time, conclusive clinical results could revolutionize the treatment of leukemia and other blood-related illnesses.

“These extraordinary advances result from the efforts of a remarkable team that includes extremely gifted students and postdoctoral investigators working in the IRIC laboratories,” adds Dr. Guy Sauvageau. “Among them, the first authors of this publication: Iman Fars, doctoral student, and Jalila Chagraoui, research officer, along with the professionals in IRIC’s medical chemistry core facility under the direction of Anne Marinier, who optimized the therapeutic properties of this new molecule.”

Context

Umbilical cord blood from newborn children is an excellent source of hematopoietic stem cells for stem cell transplants, since their immune system is still immature and the stem cells have a lower probability of inducing an adverse immune reaction in the recipient.

Furthermore, it is not necessary for the immunological compatibility between donor and recipient to be perfect, unlike in a bone marrow transplant. However, in most cases the number of stem cells obtained from an umbilical cord is much too low for treating an adult, and its use is confined above all to the treatment of children. With the new molecule UM171 it will be possible to multiply stem cells in culture and to produce enough of them to treat adults, especially those who are not Caucasian, and who because of the lack of donors have limited access to transplants.

Collaborators from the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, the British Columbia Cancer Agency, the Ontario Cancer Institute and the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center also played an important role in evaluating the biological properties of this new molecule, and those from the University of Toronto in developing the bioreactor.

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New molecule allows for up to 10-fold increase in stem cell transplants

Field Neurosciences Institute 'Close to Cures' gala returns to support stem cell breakthroughs

SAGINAW, MI Sometimes, says Dr. E. Malcolm Field, two plus two equals five or maybe even six.

He even has a law about interactive returns, looking at recent developments built on groundbreaking stem cell discoveries made at the Field Neurosciences Institute labs in Saginaw Township and Mount Pleasant. A recent study found researchers exploring the use of stem cells in creating new heart tissue. On the neurological front, it’s led to the study of a common substance found in Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s disease, possibly linking them at the most basic level.

This year’s benefit gala, “Field of Hope, Close to Cures” on Friday, Sept. 26, at the Temple Theatre, adds another tool to the home front efforts. The gala begins at 5:30 p.m. with a grand entrance featuring Dani Vitany and Ten Hands Tall, followed by a bountiful buffet and, at 8 p.m., “American Idol” 2011 winner Scotty McCreery.

Proceeds from ticket sales $125 for the entire evening; $85, $70, $55, $45 for the show alone will purchase an in vivo imagery system that will allow researchers to see how a living organism responds to different therapies rather than making after-the-fact conclusions from slices of a dead brain.

That’s important, said the institute’s executive director, Dr. Gary Dunbar.

In earlier research using equipment purchased through the institute’s annual fundraiser, researchers found that the stem cells inserted into live brain tissue weren’t found in the autopsy. But didn’t it keep the respective disease at bay for the natural life of the test animal?

“Bingo!” Dunbar said. “With the new imagery system, we can visualize what is happening with the stem cell transplant in a live animal. We can see how well it is functioning, how long it survives and why the test animal keeps doing better. Why do they work?”

If their speculation proves correct and the cells are releasing their proteins before they die, it could lead to the formation of pluripotent cells capable of delivering even more to the diseased areas.

The institute works with a growing pool of young volunteers who approach the research with unbiased perceptions and no pet theories, generating several medical papers “and not published in any old magazine,” Field said. Clinical studies on humans took place at least a decade ahead of what they predicted five years ago.

“We have youngsters who want to come back to the lab two or three times,” Field said. “They go on to prestigious colleges with what they’ve learned firsthand, and I’ve heard of some who’ve been accepted in the medical programs during their interviews at the school.”

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Field Neurosciences Institute 'Close to Cures' gala returns to support stem cell breakthroughs