Othropedic Surgeon Dr. Propper Speaks about Stem Cell Therapy – PRP – BMAC – Video



Othropedic Surgeon Dr. Propper Speaks about Stem Cell Therapy – PRP – BMAC
Orthopedic Surgeon Dr. Propper Speaks about the Difference of Stem Cell Injection Therapy PRP – BMAC.

By: Dennis Spoonhour, DC

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Othropedic Surgeon Dr. Propper Speaks about Stem Cell Therapy – PRP – BMAC – Video

GTGP Dr Linzey Stem Cell Therapy – Video



GTGP Dr Linzey Stem Cell Therapy

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GTGP Dr Linzey Stem Cell Therapy – Video

Why Integrative Medicine and Stem Cell Treatment – Video



Why Integrative Medicine and Stem Cell Treatment
Dr. Michael Belich of Integrative Medical Clinics talks about Integrative Medicine and Stem Cell Treatment. For more detailed information go to http://www.in…

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Why Integrative Medicine and Stem Cell Treatment – Video

22 days after second stem cell treatment – 16 april 2014 – Video



22 days after second stem cell treatment – 16 april 2014
My name is Carole St-Laurent, I live in Rimouski, Quebec, Canada, I have a muscular Dystrophy(spinal muscular atrophy type 2-3) since birth, I'm now 43 years…

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22 days after second stem cell treatment – 16 april 2014 – Video

Stem Cell Treatment In Panama Day 2 – Video



Stem Cell Treatment In Panama Day 2
Today my wife received her 2nd IV injection of 20 million units of Umbilical Stem Cells. She also had 3 million units injected into both left and right sides…

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Stem-Cell Treatment for Blindness Moving Through Patient …

Advanced Cell Technology is testing a stem-cell treatment for blindness that could preserve vision and potentially reverse vision loss.

Vision support: The cells used in Advanced Cell Technologys clinical trials produce dark pigments and cobblestone-like patterns that can be readily recognized in cultures.

A new treatment for macular degeneration is close to the next stage of human testinga noteworthy event not just for the millions of patients it could help, but for its potential to become the first therapy based on embryonic stem cells.

This year, the Boston-area company Advanced Cell Technology plans to move its stem-cell treatment for two forms of vision loss into advanced human trials. The company has already reported that the treatment is safe (see Eye Study Is a Small but Crucial Advance for Stem-Cell Therapy), although a full report of the results from the early, safety-focused testing has yet to be published. The planned trials will test whether it is effective. The treatment will be tested both on patients with Stargardts disease (an inherited form of progressive vision loss that can affect children) and on those with age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss among people 65 and older.

The treatment is based on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that have been grown from embryonic stem cells. A surgeon injects 150 microliters of RPE cellsroughly the amount of liquid in three raindropsunder a patients retina, which is temporarily detached for the procedure. RPE cells support the retinas photoreceptors, which are the cells that detect incoming light and pass the information on to the brain.

Although complete data from the trials of ACTs treatments have yet to be published, the company has reported impressive results with one patient, who recovered vision after being deemed legally blind. Now the company plans to publish the data from two clinical trials taking place in the U.S. and the E.U. in a peer-reviewed academic journal. Each of these early-stage trials includes 12 patients affected by either macular degeneration or Stargardts disease.

The more advanced trials will have dozens of participants, says ACTs head of clinical development, Eddy Anglade. If proved safe and effective, the cellular therapy could preserve the vision of millions affected by age-related macular degeneration. By 2020, as the population ages, nearly 200 million people worldwide will have the disease, estimate researchers. Currently, there are no treatments available for the most common form, dry age-related macular degeneration.

ACTs experimental treatment has its origins in a chance discovery that Irina Klimanskaya, the companys director of stem-cell biology, made while working with embryonic stem cells at Harvard University. These cells have the power to develop into any cell type, and in culture they often change on their own. A neuron here, a fat cell thereindividual cells in a dish tend to take random walks down various developmental paths. By supplying the cultures with fresh nutrients but otherwise leaving them to their own devices for several weeks, Klimanskaya discovered that the stem cells often developed into darkly pigmented cells that grew in a cobblestone-like pattern. She suspected that they were developing into RPE cells, and molecular tests backed her up.

Now that her discovery has advanced into an experimental treatment, Klimanskaya says she is excited by the hints that it may be able to preserve, and perhaps restore, sight. She recalls a voice mail she received during her second year at ACT: a person blinded by an inherited condition thanked her for her work, whether or not there was a treatment available for him. When you get a message like this, you feel like you are not doing it in vain, she says.

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Stem-Cell Treatment for Blindness Moving Through Patient …

Scientists create stem cells from adult skin cells

A breakthrough in human stem cell research could lead to the treatment of countless diseases, invaluable scientific research and yes, human cloning.

According to a study in the journalCell Stem Cell, scientists have synthesized human embryonic stem cells from the cells of adults, creating two different lines from the skin of two donors.

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Using the nuclear transfermethod,scientists took DNA out of egg cells and replaced it with the donor DNA. The cells were basically reprogrammed, butof the 77 samplesonly two fully developed into cloned stem cells.

Lead researcher Robert Lanza says the 5 percent success rate isn’t surprising.”Reprogramming is more difficult for adult cells than for fetal [and] infant cells, presumably at least in part because their epigenetic landscape from the pluripotent state,”meaning the cells generally dont’ have the right enzymes for change anymore.

The researchers reportedly tweaked a method made famous by the cloning of the sheep Dolly in 1996 and improved by scientists at Oregon Health & Science University just last year.

The nuclear transfermethod is the third discovered way to harvest or create stem cells. In the past, scientists have extracted cells from leftover embryos after in vitro fertilizations,a controversial practice. And in 2006 aJapanese researcher discovered a way to create themby injecting new genes. (ViaAsian Scientist)

Lanza’s method could provide easy access to stem cells, opening up new research intodiseases like diabetes, Parkinsons and even leukemia. And according toNPR, the researcher wants to create a virtual library of cells using carefully selected DNA donors.

The implications of a real and viable approach for creating stem cells could be startling, andscientists have been wrestling with the ethical questions since the cloning of Dolly.

An official at Oregon Health & Science Universitythinks studying stemcells is necessary, tellingTime,They have become kind of like cursed cells. But we clearly need to understand more about them.

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Scientists create stem cells from adult skin cells

Top stem cell scientist joins Stemedica

Stem cell scientist Mahendra Rao, former director of the now-defunct Center For Regenerative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Photo taken in December, 2013 during a speech by Rao at the World Stem Cell Summit in San Diego.

One of the nation’s top stem cell scientists has become an adviser to San Diego’s Stemedica, a developer of stem cell-based therapies.

Dr. Mahendra Rao joined Stemedica’s scientific and medical advisory board, and will help guide the company’s strategy, said Maynard Howe, chief executive of the privately held company. Rao’s career as a scientist who has also worked for companies and federal agencies makes him particularly useful, Howe said.

Rao is a medical doctor with a PhD in developmental neurobiology from CalTech. He headed the neurosciences division of the National Institute on Aging. He also led the stem cell division of Carlsbad-based Life Technologies, now a unit of Thermo Fisher Scientific. The two companies are on good terms: Life Technologies sells two kinds of stem cells made by Stemedica, used for research purposes, Howe said.

Rao was most recently founding director of the Center for Regenerative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, which has been shut down. Rao, who resigned at the end of March, said he was disappointed at the slow pace of funding studies with artificial embryonic stem cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells. Stemedica announced his appointment April 8.

Rao said Wednesday that his goal now is to advance stem cell therapies through the private sector. Stemedica drew his attention because it had developed a method of reliably generating “clinically compliant” stem cells suitable for use in therapy.

In addition, Rao said he likes that Stemedica is developing combination stem cell therapies, using a variety called mesenchymal stem cells. This variety of stem cell generates chemicals that promote short-term regrowth and seems to enhance the survival of other transplanted stem cells. For example, mesenchymal stem cells could help transplanted neural stem cells integrate into the brain.

“That’s a high-risk process and it’s a much more difficult road, but they seem to be willing to do that,” Rao said.

He has also rejoined the board of Q Therapeutics, a Salt Lake City company developing treatments for spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders. Rao is the company’s scientific founder, but had to leave the company when he joined the NIH.

Stemedica and its affiliated companies are undertaking multiple clinical trials of stem cell therapies. One of the most advanced is for stroke, Howe said. See utsandiego.com/stemedicastroke1 for detailed information.

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Top stem cell scientist joins Stemedica

Diff bw Surgical Hair Transplantaion & Stem Cell Therapy – Health file – Video



Diff bw Surgical Hair Transplantaion Stem Cell Therapy – Health file
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Diff bw Surgical Hair Transplantaion & Stem Cell Therapy – Health file – Video

Hello Doctor Zee 24 Taas Dr Nandini Gokulchandran talks about Brain Related different type – Video



Hello Doctor Zee 24 Taas Dr Nandini Gokulchandran talks about Brain Related different type
Hello Doctor Zee 24 Taas Dr Nandini Gokulchandran talks about Stem Cell Therapy Treatments Hello Doctor Zee 24 Taas Dr Nandini Gokulchandran talks about Brai…

By: Klara Deal

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Hello Doctor Zee 24 Taas Dr Nandini Gokulchandran talks about Brain Related different type – Video